Traffic Simulation Comes to Autodesk InfraWorks 360

Latest update to Autodesk InfraWorks 360 brings a more integrated approach between design and analysis.

Roadway design can be a highly iterative process with designers having to balance multiple factors – the demands of geographic and financial constraints, compliance with geometric guidelines, management of safety, as well as providing suitable capacity for vehicles. The traffic simulation and analysis capabilities included in the latest update to Autodesk InfraWorks 360 brings us closer to a position where all of these considerations can be addressed in a single intelligent, 3D model, drastically cutting the time required to gain approval from all internal parties on the final design.

The addition of Traffic Simulation for InfraWorks 360 isn’t the only update. On the collaboration side, the ability to share models in read-only mode has been added to provide designers better control over their model data, as well as may other features for Road, Rail and Bridge design.

Traffic Simulation The ability to run traffic simulation models has been available as an Autodesk Labs Preview for the past few months and has now graduated to become an official part of Roadway Design for InfraWorks 360. This addition gives the designer greater confidence in the roadway design that is passed to the traffic engineer for detailed analysis. Designers have full control over which roads are analyzed and have the ability to input traffic flow and mix, specify time of day (e.g. to model rush hour), define turn lanes and set up signalized intersections. It even works on roundabouts! With the ability to analyze and optimize as part of the design process, it is more likely to comply with capacity requirements so that designers won’t be going back and forth with the traffic engineers making numerous minor enhancements to the design.

Traffic simulation module in Infraworks 360The highly intuitive graphical interface of the Traffic Simulation module makes it clear when roads have exceeded capacity requirements and make it easy to identify where changes need to be made.

Beyond the additional capabilities related to traffic simulation and analysis, there are several other new features and improvements:

  • Rail Design: Designers can now create their own detailed rail styles allowing greater flexibility in defining the various structures along a rail track. This is especially useful for troughs at tunnel entrances, circular tunnels, viaducts, etc. Rail features can also now be grouped together in InfraWorks 360. For example, when you have 2 rail tracks, you can create a single bridge to carry both tracks versus having to create a bridge for each track. You can also specify the length of transitions between rail styles.
  • Road Design: The main enhancement for road designers in this update is the improved intersection modeling. The intersection editing tool can now be used for staggered intersections bringing greater flexibility to the design. Right-In, Right-Out intersections, and Left-In, Left-Out intersections can now be created simply. Roundabouts have also been updated to support both left and right hand drive roads and include standard based road markings and yield lines.
  • Bridge Design: Piers and Foundations now have a library of alternative design styles which can be used to make models more realistic. These parts can be customized further in detail via the asset card. And if there are multiple components (piers, girders, etc.) any change to one of these can be quickly applied across the design to similar components. Model regeneration and quantity/volume calculations are now carried out only when required, reducing unnecessary model regeneration, significantly improving performance.

Rail-Conceptual-enhancementsThe grouping feature in InfraWorks 360 allows a designer to use a single bridge to carry multiple tracks versus having to create a bridge for each track.

Staggered-Intersection-with-lane-markingsIntersection design enhancements in InfraWorks 360 bring greater flexibility to created more complex designs such as staggered intersections.

For more details on all the ways that the latest update of InfraWorks 360 can help improve the design of complete civil engineering projects, read Mark Burgess’ blog post on BIM on the Rocks.
You can also find more information here:

 What’s new video –
 InfraWorks 360 product center –
 InfraWorks 360 trial –
 InfraWorks 360 Community Center –

PAS 1192-2 in Consultation until 31st August

PAS 1192-2 and BS1192:2007 are 2 key documents in the UK’s Level 2 BIM Framework. They are currently both undergoing an update and are under consultation. This means that you get a chance to help shape the future of the industry with your suggestions. Remember, there’s no point complaining about how things work if you haven’t attempted to make them better yourself!

Two key documents at the heart of BIM Level 2, PAS 1192-2 and BS1192:2007, are being revised by BSI with the proposals available for comment until the end of August.

The PAS 1192-2 Specification for information management for the capital/delivery phase of construction projects using building information modelling is available here – and the BS1192:2007 Collaborative production of architectural, engineering and construction information – Code of practices available here.

PAS 1192-2 was originally released in 2013, while BS1192 was last updated in 2008. Both documents are being revised to update out-of-date wording and reduce conflicts between the two standards.

Read the full article here on BIM+

Information delivery – AIM maintenance

Checked Components View

Featured Image -- 2630

Ben Malone:

When working in a 3D model based environment, we often use Solibri Model Checker to check and validate model integrity, guided by a number of unique rulesets. But how can you PROVE that all of the desired components have been checked? “We are familiar with this question, and it is not unreasonable. In a 2D plan review, we get a signature, and maybe a stamp, that says the plans have been checked. When introducing model-based checks, it is only natural that users will ask “how can I be sure that you haven’t missed something?”. Our answer is the Checked Components View feature in SMC.”

Originally posted on :

When running checks in Solibri Model Checker (SMC), you should feel confident that your rulesets are actually checking the correct components for their requirements. The Results View lists components in the model that fail a check, but at some point you will find yourself interested in what the components are that are checked in the first place.  The Checked Components View lists what components have been checked, passed, and failed and thereby isolates those components in the 3DView.  In addition, as you review your results of a check, you can use CheckComponents to isolate components in the model based on the results of issues being accepted, rejected, or undefined.

You can follow along with the examples in this article by opening the SMC Building.smc file that comes with SMC.

To open the Checked Components View, click the AddView  ADD_VIEW button and select  Checked Components CheckedComponents. A drop…

View original 600 more words

Project Expo – Immersive Visualisation in the Cloud

Yesterday saw the release of Autodesk Stingray, an immersive real-time visualisation platform.


Autodesk have now revealed details of Project Expo – This seems like it is built on top of Stingray, to provide real time visualisation, in the cloud! Project Expo was released yesterday via the Autodesk Labs, it is a confidential beta, so although you can use it, you can’t talk about it – a bit like Fight Club!

Project Expo leverages Autodesk’s powerful new game engine, Stingray, and puts it to use for professionals in Architecture, Engineering, and Construction. Our cloud service makes the conversion from BIM to real-time automatic and simple as the click of a button. If you are a Revit user, and this is something you would like to try, you can request to join the project.

We’d love to hear from Architects, who want to fit immersive visualization into their design process, to find out how we can make this technology better. We plan to keep improving it for the duration of the Technology Preview. You can reach us at or in the discussion forums available to participants on the project.

Architectural immersion is alive in the lab.

So, what are you waiting for? Sign up today via Autodesk Labs and try out this new technology preview before your friends and colleagues get a chance. You could also help shape the future of the products with your feedback.

Autodesk Stingray Real-Time Visualisation Engine

Building designers can use Stingray to make their BIM-informed visualizations interactive in real-time through a direct link from the engine to 3ds Max
Autodesk Stingray Real-Time Engine Takes Design Visualization to a New Level for AEC Industry

Building designers can use Stingray to make their BIM-informed visualizations interactive in real-time through a direct link from the engine to 3ds Max

Today, at the Game Developers Conference (GDC) Europe 2015, Autodesk announced the release of Stingray, a real-time engine that can be used to create high quality 3D games, or be applied in the AEC industry to make BIM-informed 3D visualizations in 3ds Max fully interactive in a real-time environment. It means going anywhere in the model and seeing everything as you would in the physical world. The Stingray engine is built on the powerful, data-driven architecture of the Bitsquid engine, which Autodesk acquired last summer.

The new Stingray engine has profound implications for building designers, as it creates connected workflows with Autodesk 3D animation software like 3ds Max, which already supports a BIM process. The Stingray engine features a live link ability with the latest version of 3ds Max, which makes it possible to have changes made in 3ds Max happen immediately in the Stingray engine. To understand the impact of this new capability within 3ds Max, let’s take a look at the state of a BIM workflow using Autodesk solutions before today’s announcement.

The Stingray engine allows designers, owners and stakeholders to access and visualize a building model in real-time to fully understand the scale, feel and experience of the building before construction starts.

Building designers using Autodesk Revit software have had the ability to easily import models into 3ds Max to create stunning, photo-real images and animations to communicate design intent. It’s a workflow that’s been widely accepted in the AEC industry and plays an integral part in the design process. Now, with the Stingray engine, Revit models can be brought into 3ds Max to be made visually stunning and then imported to the Stingray engine to be made fully interactive, allowing users to explore “what if” design changes in a compelling visual environment not unlike a first person walk-about in a physical building. The real advantage of this is that it allows designers, owners and stakeholders to access and visualize a building model in real-time to fully understand the scale, feel and experience of the building before construction starts.

The Stingray engine features a live link ability with the latest version of 3ds Max, which makes it possible to have changes made in 3ds Max happen immediately in the Stingray engine

As a powerful real-time rendering engine, Stingray will help power Autodesk’s vision for connected visualization within a BIM process. The abilities that Stingray offers are the first step towards a connected future where software like Revit, 3ds Max and 3D environments like the Stingray engine, work seamlessly together to allow users to truly understand a design. By allowing real-time control, design changes and challenges may be quickly communicated in a compelling, visual way.

“We are opening a new door in the way buildings will be designed now and in the future that allows a live, interactive connection to designs,” said Amar Hanspal, Senior Vice President, Autodesk. “Imagine being able to meet your stakeholders for a tour of your building design model in a virtual space while collaborating to inform the design process. We are excited about this technology as it will help enable better decisions to be made prior to construction, where it gets really expensive to make changes.”

More Information, Pricing and Availability
For more about the Stingray engine and how it is fueling a new design process for AEC professionals, visit Be sure to also check out this video and podcast with Angi Izzi, Senior Strategy Manager for Architecture, Autodesk and Rick Davis, Design Visualization Industry Manager, Autodesk.

Stingray is expected to be available as a desktop subscription download starting August 19. For more about Stingray, including availability and subscription pricing information, visit


What’s New In Revit 2016?

As you all may have noticed, Revit 2016 has now been released, but what new features do we all have to play with? Rob Clark from Excitech posted the following videos explaining what’s new in Revit Architecture, Revit Structure, Revit MEP & AutoCAD Civil 3D 2016.

KUBUS releases BIMcollab®

The world’s first OpenBIM issue management platform in the cloud

KUBUS announces the release of its new ground breaking BCF based issue management system in the cloud: BIMcollab®. It operates across applications; it helps bridging the differences between BIM tools and targets the multidisciplinary cooperation between companies working on construction projects. BIMcollab® is designed to manage issues during design and construction phases where BIM is used.


“We are happy to invite users to try BIMcollab for free on Upload BCF files or connect to BIM applications and invite team members to view your issues. Improving communication in BIM projects starts today.” says Erik Pijnenburg CEO of KUBUS

Issues found with Solibri Model Checker can be published directly to BIMcollab® without the use of files. The BIM modeler will automatically receive a notification and can immediately lookup the problematic objects in his BIM authoring tool (Revit, ArchiCAD, etc.). Once a solution is designed, the issue will be reported back to the BIM manager as ‘resolved’.


BIMcollab® is cloud based. It offers easy access anywhere and anytime from any device like mobiles and tablets. It also allows creating issues by taking photo’s at the construction site. The real-time connections ensure up-to-date information. With the release of BIMcollab®, KUBUS now offers BCF Managers for free. These add-ons for Revit, ArchiCAD and simplebim have a direct link to BIMcollab®.

Visit the BIMcollab YouTube page here for more videos

For more information please visit

BIMopedia: 2014 in review

Happy New Year to all followers and visitors. Thank you for continuing to support BIMopedia last year. As you can see from the stats below, this blog was viewed around 100,000 times in 2014, which I find quite remarkable!

In 2015 I plan to post at least 1 blog per month relating to Navisworks, Solibri and general BIM workflows. Apologies for recent inactivity!

If you are interested in viewing more of BIMopedia’s stats from 2014 – read on!

The stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The Louvre Museum has 8.5 million visitors per year. This blog was viewed about 100,000 times in 2014. If it were an exhibit at the Louvre Museum, it would take about 4 days for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Update: BIM Talk – Dictionary and Acronyms

It is a job in itself trying to stay on top of all the acronyms and terms used in the BIM world. With new standards and classifications released regularly, the number of terms continues to grow.

Rob Jackson from Bond Bryan Architects has put together two documents which cover all of the known acronyms and terms which you may (or may not) have heard being used:

BIM Dictionary

BIM Acronyms








As these documents are updated regularly, it will be worth adding to your bookmarks to ensure you are viewing the latest revision.

Bond Bryan’s BIM blog is also well worth checking out – There are a number of excellent articles already posted and is updated regularly. Click here to view the blog.

From Siteworks to Site Designer

Ben Malone:

Excellent round up of the new Site Tools in Revit by Aaron Maller. Thanks to LandArchBIM for the post.

EDIT- Aaron has kindly updated his review on the new Site Tools in Revit link here:

UPDATE- Rob Clark has also published his thoughts on the Site Tools on his blog here:

Originally posted on landarchBIM:

Autodesk released the R2 Update for Revit 2015 yesterday. With that update comes “over 30 user-requested features that add powerful capabilities, enhance software performance and improve user productivity.” Included among these is the Site Designer Extension.

While Site Designer may sound new, it is actually the latest version of Eagle Point’s Siteworks repackaged and “specifically optimized” by Autodesk. This is not surprising, as Eagle Point suspended sales of both Revit add-ins (Siteworks and LandCADD) a while ago.

Though I do not expect any new features in Site Designer, it is available

View original 124 more words

Thoughtful Leadership

My boss, and CEO of Spacegroup, Rob Charlton has shared some fantastic and thought provoking articles within the team, which I thought I’d share on here with my readers.

The first is a report produced by Government setting out the future trends of the sector. This is certainly relevant to all of us, using digital technologies and processes to try and transform the construction sector to be a truly collaborative, sustainable and cost efficient market.

Construction has a £90 billion market in the UK and covers around 10% of all UK employment. Yet still, is one of the least efficient sectors in the UK and worldwide, with huge amounts of material waste and fundamental issues. This report discusses the current state of the sector, supported by statistics, as well as discussing future strategies and opportunities for growth in the UK construction market.

In September 2012, BIS Secretary of State Vince Cable announced a review of key strategic sectors to the UK’s growth and competitiveness. Construction is one of them. Historically, the UK construction sector has been a vital sector for the UK economy and a key driver of growth. In spite of the challenges the sector has recently faced, construction continues to be one of the largest UK sectors and a key source of the UK’s value added and employment.

The global construction market is, however, facing major transformation as businesses continue to respond to the challenges of the economic crisis since 2008, begin to shift to green and sustainable construction, and seek to take advantage of the opportunities provided by the digital economy. The competitiveness and readiness of the UK construction sector will be crucial if the UK is to take advantage of these opportunities. 

View the BIS, UK Construction: An economic analysis of the sector report here.

The second is a RIBA published article which reflects on the annual Collander survey. Discussing, more specifically the role of the Architect in construction, and how companies are recovering from the recession. It includes some interesting and in some cases, slightly worrying statistics. Read the “Success begins at home” article here.

If you are in the mood to read reports, Construction 2025 is also an excellent document which is a joint industry and government publication and sets out a number of targets to be achieved in the next 10 or so years.

Finally Rob shared one of his favourite talks, Steve Jobs shares 3 personal stories to commencement graduates from Stamford University in 2005 – In it he talks about getting fired from Apple in 1985 and life & death. Each story is one of mistakes, decisions, growth and success. The moral of the stories is, to do what you love, work hard and make a difference

Can the construction sector learn from its mistakes of the past and turn this into positive growth? 


You can read more of Rob’s thoughts and find out what he’s sharing on his _space blog.


MRUG – Revit Tips, Tricks & Tutorials

You can download the back catalogue of Revit tips and tricks from both the Manchester and Midlands Revit user groups as a single download up to meeting No. 8. After meeting 8, tips and tricks are uploaded on an individual meeting basis. Videos are not narrated.

A taster of some of the presentations from the latest meeting on July 17th include:

Autodesk Revit Adaptive Components, by Jon Frost of Cadassist
The COBieNATOR: The MRUG Cut, by Rob Jackson of Bond Byran Architects
Taking Revit to the construction site and back, by Paul Walker, Autodesk 360 Product Manager

Visit the Manchester Revit User Group website here to view and download presentations and tutorials. Thanks to Rob Clark, the organisers and sponsors for sharing the content.


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